Connect with us

U.S. Open

WORLD OF TENNIS STILL SPLIT OVER SERENA, BUT ADMIRING OF OSAKA

Jane Voigt

Published

on

This U.S. Open should have been a celebration. After all the Open Era began in 1968, 50 years ago. Serena Williams was inches from her 24th Grand Slam title. Novak Djokovic came through to win multiple majors in a single season: Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

Yet, this tournament ended poorly.

Celebrations were overshadowed by the women’s final, where Williams and Naomi Osaka jettisoned the expected celebratory moment way beyond the confines of Arthur Ashe Stadium. They went to a place many didn’t want to inhabit.

Reactions have varied, though. Twitter and Facebook remain alive with opinions, most siding with Serena. But was Serena right? Was Carlos Ramos, the chair umpire for the final, just another man on a perch dealing out male judgments toward a woman? Was he right to dock her a game? Was the incident sexist?

Monday on ESPN’s Pardon The Interruption, Michael Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser stood with Serena. Wilbon thought Ramos should be sanctioned.

Sally Jenkins, columnist for The Washington Post, took a firm stand alongside Serena, writing, “Chair umpire Carlos managed to rob not only one but two players in the women’s U.S. Open final. No one has seen anything like this.”

Tuesday morning Martina Navratilova aired her opinion in an op-ed for The New York Times, “Martina Navratilova: What Serena Got Wrong.”

Navratilova, winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles, thought Williams was partially right.

Image – Jimmie 48

“There is a huge double standard for women when it comes to how bad behavior is punished – and not just in tennis,” Navratilova wrote. However, she questioned the incident from another angle: “Rather, I think the question we have to ask ourselves is this: What is the right way to behave to honor our sport and to respect our opponents?” She asks if Carlos Ramos, the chair umpire, could have “gotten away with calling the umpire a thief” if the player was male.

Finally, she made this point: “We cannot measure ourselves by what we think we should also be able to get away with. In fact, this is the sort of behavior that no one should be engaging in on court.”

Bottom line: There’s a time and place for disagreement and outright yelling, but the U.S. Open final isn’t it.

I appeared on “The Drive, Monday Sept 10th,” which aired on ESPN Blacksburg radio. The show’s host, Paul VanWagoner, asked me who was to blame for the chaotic conclusion to the match. I finally admitted “Serena,” adding that she might not have reacted, and continued to react, so boldly had she been playing better. Previous outbreaks from Williams during major finals — the 2011 U.S. Open against Samantha Stosur comes to mind — have followed poor performances, or at least, outbursts tied to what Williams would have considered poor performances, namely … not winning.

Novak Djokovic, who won his fourth Open title Sunday, also chimed in. He split the incident. In his postmatch press conference, he said that Ramos “pushed Serena to the limit” and “changed the course of the match, which in my opinion was unnecessary,” The Independent reported.

So what about Naomi Osaka? She was the winner of the women’s final, the player who was caught up in the whirlwind that had fans packed inside Ashe Stadium booing. On which side of the net have reactions to Osaka landed?

The Associated Press in Japan struck a different perspective. “Osaka charms Japan with her manners – and Broken Japanese.” The piece focused on Osaka as the winner of the final who was born in Japan to a Japanese mother and Haitian father. Japanese readers, it seems, have “embraced” Osaka and her victory, calling her “‘a new heroine that Japan is proud of” and the “New Queen.”

Their readers were captivated by Osaka’s game, her manners, and her broken English. Who can forget the image of her bowing to Serena at the net after her victory and, again, bowing on the podium as she accepted the trophy after apologizing for her win?

“I know everybody was cheering for her; and, I’m sorry that it had to end like this. Thank you for watching the match,” Osaka said at the time, as I reported on Twitter.  

There is no right answer to this unfortunate occasion. No one person, place or thing to blame. However, this episode will make tennis think about its rules and organizational structures, its own prejudices, and its place in the evolving history of women athletes competing in what we all can agree is a male-dominated world of sports.

Jane knew beyond a doubt her life was about tennis: Playing it and writing about it. She packed up her life in Chicago and headed for the east coast where better tennis weather and opportunities awaited. When the U.S. Open Series took off, 2007, Jane pitched a traveling road-show of coverage to several editors, yet it was TennisServer.com that opened its doors. Five years later she developed her own website, DownTheTee.com, while continuing to write for TheTennisIsland.com, TennisGrandstand.com, WorldTennisMagazine.com, and, at times, tennis.com. The landscape broadened for Jane as she covered pro tennis as a member of the accredited media on site at the BNP Paribas Open (2009, 2015), The Miami Open (2008, 2009, 2012-14), Volvo Car Open (2009-2018), Rogers Cup (2009), Citi Open (2009-10, 2012-2018) and The International Tennis Hall of Fame Tournament (2014-15). To stay extra sharp in all things tennis, Jane worked for 18 years as the merchandise buyer for tennis specialty at Washington Golf and Country Club, Arlington, Virginia.

Advertisement Big Savings for Big Fans at Fanatics.com

Trending