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Roundtable – WTA Major Showdowns in 2019

Tennis Accent Staff

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Robert Deutsch - USA TODAY Sports

What is the one WTA matchup you really want to see at the major tournaments in 2019?

JANE VOIGT — @downthetee

The unrivaled match of the U.S. Open was a fourth-round encounter between Naomi Osaka and Aryana Sabalenka. It was the only match of Osaka’s tour de force in New York that went three sets. Osaka, up against what could be described as a mirror image of herself in Sabalenka, broke through a wall of competition that day she hadn’t been asked to do in three prior rounds and, perhaps, her career. This was a match that could have defined Osaka in unflattering terms, so the burden of victory lay at her feet.

Sabalenka, also 20, is, like Osaka, a woman at the threshold of a promising career. She arrived at the Open having won her first title at the Connecticut Open. Her powerful groundstrokes compared equally to those of Osaka. Their serves were weapons. Their on-court intuition was honed. Thinking back to that Labor Day encounter, the meeting feels like a sign of things to come. Another matchup between them, this time at the Australian Open, could confirm a budding rivalry that is much needed on the WTA Tour. It would be an ideal start to the 2019 Grand Slam season.

ANDREW BURTON — @burtonad

There have been two constant features in the WTA since 2008: Serena Williams, if fit, is an excellent bet to go deep in a big tournament; hardly anybody else is.

There was a period between 2011 and 2013 when Viktoria Azarenka looked like she might establish herself as the next bankable player, when she competed in 7 semifinals out of a possible 10 major tournaments. But the 2013 U.S. Open marked the last time Azarenka went deep in a major.

To my mind, this has deprived the WTA of part of the lifeblood of the sport: compelling new rivalries. To take one example, Caroline Wozniacki and Simona Halep, then 27 and 26 respectively, met in the 2018 Australian Open final as the No. 2 and No. 1 seed respectively, but were playing each other for only the seventh time. (The woeful WTA site lists a 0-0 head-to-head record. Can’t they afford decent programmers?)

Sloane Stephens, last year’s U.S. Open winner, and Naomi Osaka, the 2018 champion, have met only once to date – in Acapulco in 2016. Stephens came out on top then, 6-3, 7-5. I’d like to see Osaka’s confident shotmaking against Stephens’ superb measured defense and length of shot in 2019 – and have that be one of a suite of excellent new rivalries in the women’s game.

MERT ERTUNGA — @MertovsTDesk 

When answering this question, I am assuming that both players are in-form, because I am interested in the challenges the particular matchup brings to the table. With that in mind, the one matchup I would like to see is Madison Keys versus Simona Halep at the U.S. Open.

These two players have not faced each other since 2016 and never on U.S. soil. Thus, Halep’s 5-1 lead (including the walkover in Rome this year) does not mean much, considering that Keys has improved by leaps and bounds over the last two years. Let’s also keep in mind that Keys has shown great form at the U.S. Open, reaching the final in 2017 and semifinals in 2018, losing each time to the eventual winner. It is her favorite major of the year, probably the one where she dreams of making her big splash.

With Simona’s wonderful footwork and Madison’s high-octane striking, played possibly on what could be called “Madison’s turf,” this matchup promises high-quality tennis. Naturally, the speed of the surface will matter. If the snail-pace surface of this year still lingers in 2019 (I hope not), we could have long rallies in which Keys would need to take bigger cuts at balls to put the ball past one of the best movers in women’s tennis in the Open Era (Arantxa, I have not forgotten you).

This is also a baseline challenge for Simona, who would need to rely on what I believe to be her biggest source of improvement from the baseline, which is the ability to change the direction of the ball as well as accelerate. In the past, her backhand down the line was a step ahead of the other patterns in terms of changing direction and accelerating, but the current version of Halep is able to do that from anywhere on the court.

This matchup would push each player to dig deeper in their manuals of problem-solving. Two examples: Keys would need to put her drop shots to use in order not to let Halep get too comfortable at the baseline. Simona would need to pay special attention to her first-serve placement in order not to let Madison unleash from the first ball of the rally on her serves.

Hopefully, each will get to the end of August without having suffered any serious injury, ready to launch a title run in New York.

BRIANA FOUST — @4TheTennis

Since Serena won her 23rd major, the slams have been a free-for-all on the women’s side, but the WTA has still not produced a consistent rivalry during that time frame. There has not been a case of two women pushing each other at majors since Serena Williams and Victoria Azarenka during 2012 and 2013. One matchup I want to see more of from the WTA at major tournaments in 2019 is Simona Halep versus Sloane Stephens.

These two have the perfect ingredients for a compelling rivalry: close in age, popular major champions, still improving their styles of tennis, and they are both competitive on all surfaces. Their final in Montreal this year was inspiring to watch as a tennis fan. Halep and Stephens used every shot in the book and every inch of the court in trying to outmaneuver the other.

That match reminded me a lot of Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic during the 2010-2012 period. To me that was the zenith of their rivalry, which culminated in the six-hour 2012 Australian Open final, but during those years we saw those guys push each other to their absolute limits while reimagining what could be possible on a tennis court. I think Halep and Stephens have the potential to do the same.

MATT ZEMEK — @mzemek

Venus Williams-Garbine Muguruza at Wimbledon in 2017 gave us a very compelling first set before Muguruza ran away with the second. Serena Williams-Naomi Osaka at the 2018 U.S. Open was a fascinating match until YOU KNOW WHAT happened.

In 2019, I would love to see another major-tournament matchup, ideally a semifinal or final, between two players with at least a 10-year age gap between them.

In 2018, one week before winning her first Wimbledon and her third major, Angelique Kerber calmly dissected Naomi Osaka in the third round on Centre Court. Osaka was recovering from an abdominal injury she suffered in the grass warm-up season, so she was not in prime position to mount a challenge to Kerber. Maybe the next time, that matchup could sparkle on grass, but an element of mystery has been removed from it.

Let’s try the other 20-year-old on the WTA Tour who made a splash this past summer: Aryna Sabalenka. Let’s see her face Kerber on Wimbledon laws next year.

I don’t like to predict big riches and successes for very young players until I see “the moment,” the loud and thunderous statement which makes greatness too overwhelming to ignore. Sabalenka certainly impressed in Cincinnati, New Haven and New York, but Osaka captured “the moment.” I would love to see Sabalenka – tested by the WTA Tour in the first half of 2019 – make her way to the All-England Club as a target, which did not apply to her 2018 visit. That trip to SW19 was cut short in round one by Mihaela Buzarnescu.

If Sabalenka makes a deep run at Wimbledon in 2019, she could take the place of Jelena Ostapenko in 2018. Ostapenko met Kerber in a young-versus-old semifinal, and Kerber found the consistency needed to short-circuit the always-aggressive Latvian. Sabalenka hits big, but she shows signs of being able to play with more margin than Ostapenko does.

Imagine three sets of Sabalenka slugging versus Kerber court coverage. Oh, yeah.

You know you want it.

The Tennis With An Accent staff produces roundtable articles and other articles with group input during the tennis season. Staff articles belong to the TWAA family of writers and contributors, as opposed to any individual commentator. Our staff produces roundtables every week of the tennis season, so that you will always know what the TWAA staff thinks about the important tennis topics of the times.

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